The University of Kansas hosts screening and discussion of Pussy Riot documentary next week


It’s been three years since the world first learned of Russia’s anti-Putin, feminist punk group Pussy Riot, and in that time we have followed the dangerous and startling reports from Moscow – most significantly, the arrests of Pussy Riot members Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina in 2012, their subsequent sentencing, and the polarizing criticism and admiration the women have received in their country and around the world.

It’s a story that gets your attention, and it’s the focus of the 2013 Russian-British documentary Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer. On Wednesday, May 7, from 7 to 9 p.m., the University of Kansas hosts a showing of the film in the Malott Room of the Kansas Union.

On Thursday, May 8, the University hosts a discussion on “the group’s significance in Russia.” There will be a panel featuring Ani Kokobobo, assistant professor of Slavic languages and literatures, and Andrew Gilbert, doctoral student of women, gender and sexuality studies. The discussion will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Kansas Room of the Kansas Union.

In the press release for these events, Kokobobo spoke about the themes for the panel discussion on May 8.

“In addressing the ‘past’ of Pussy Riot we will consider questions such as: what made the punk prayer so offensive in Putin’s Russia; and did the protest and arrest of Pussy Riot fit with a general atmosphere of protest in Russia at the time? We will also address the current factions in Pussy Riot after the release of Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina.”


Both the documentary screening May 7 and the discussion May 8 are free and open to the public. These events are presented by the University of Kansas Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies and the departments of Slavic Languages and Literatures; Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; and the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center. 

Details here

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