Letters from the week of March 4

Feature: “Fake Reefer Madness,” February 18

What a Drag

Peter Rugg’s article on K2 was the best comprehensive story on the crackdown I’ve read. I can’t tell you how sad I am for the local business owners who are being treated like criminals. I can’t believe I live in a place where this takes precedent over solving a budget and unemployment crisis. Way to go, lawmakers. These people are out-of-touch fools.

Brian Ashley
Kansas City, Kansas

Attn., Dopers: Do Your Research!

After reading your cover story on the ban of K2 synthetic marijuana, I’ve come to realize two things: (1) Regardless of what form any high may take, legislated bans will begin to take effect as soon as an ill-informed YouTube post on said pleasure-inducing drug is read by our ever-watchful police departments and stay-at-home mothers across the country, and (2) advocates of these experimental chemicals and mild hallucinogens are, sadly, ignorant to the fact that we still live in the dark ages of misinformation. If we want these things to be accepted as legal (or at least have the proper documentation for the inevitable battle over them), we have to be prepared just as quickly as those ever-present legal beagles. People can say they “didn’t have enough time to do proper research,” but we constantly go through this! No matter what the debated chemical is — salvia, K2 or Kentucky Bluegrass — as soon as these “psychotropics” are introduced, it’s up to us to jump on the research bandwagon. Maybe we’ll put down our collective bongs and take action faster the next time.

Chris Gonzales
Independence

The Sex Edition: “The Wife,” February 11

What He Said

I found your Sex Edition interesting. I felt bad for the young woman who became pregnant only to find out her partner was seeing someone else. But it got my mind to wonder.

Is it entirely paranoid to suspect that all those stoppers, thingamajigs and substances devised to prevent conception were intended not to liberate womankind from the biological and social penalties imposed on her natural passions but rather, at the insidious design of capitalistic puritans in order to technologize sex, to dilute its dark juices; to contain its wilder fires; to censor its sweet nastiness; to scrub it clean; to order it uniform; to render it safe; to eliminate the risk of uncontrollable feelings, illogical commitments and deep involvements; to make sexual love so secure, same and sanitary, so slick and frolicsome, so casual, that it’s not a manifestation of love at all but a near anonymous scratching of a bunny itch, an itch far removed from any direct relation of the feverish enigmas of life and death, and a scratching programmed so that it in no way would interfere with the real purpose of human beings in a capitalistic, puritanical society, which is to produce goods and consume them, a gnawing at her very concepts of love?

We cannot possibly answer that question. Hell, we can’t even ask it without getting winded. And, yes, the ’60s were good to me.

Alan Manker
Kansas City, Missouri

Music: “Bad Vibrations,” February 18

Her Two Centz

I am a 27-year-old female from Overland Park and was a listener of Shorty and the Boyz on KCHZ 95.7 (the Vibe). As part of the demographic they mentioned being forced by their station to cater to. I am very disappointed with the Vibe’s switch to a more pop-rock-focused playlist. My message to corporate types in charge of the station is to embrace an authentically urban-style station and do away with the pop rock. I would add, however, that Shorty and the Boyz was a terrible morning show with a very fake, prerecorded feel. The jokes weren’t funny, the hosts weren’t cool, and I often wondered how long they would be allowed to stay on-air.

I wish them well with an online audience, and maybe the freedom they have will bring on a more authentic version of their own vision for a hip-hop radio show. But the bottom line was, the show was terrible, and now the station as a whole is terrible, too. Ah well, it seems I have one more available radio-station button to program in my car. Wait, I have XM now anyway.

Erin Baxter, Overland Park

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